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Reporting Sexual Violence

If you or someone you know has been affected by sexual assault, please refer to the following information and resources both on and off campus. 

What to do immediately after a sexual assault

Your safety is important. Go to a safe place away from the perpetrator and call 9-1-1 or 7-9-1-1 from a campus phone.

Report the assault to authorities

You may file a police report with Campus Police for sexual assaults occurring on campus or with local police for sexual assaults occurring off campus.

Campus Police903-463-8777 during regular business hours. If no answer, call or text the 24-hour Campus Police Department cell phone at 903-814-3343.

For immediate sexual assault victim services, contact the  Grayson County Crisis Center 24-Hour hotline, at 903-893-5615. 



Reporting sexual assaults on-campus

Campus Police – 903-463-8777 during regular business hours. If no answer, call or text the 24-hour Campus Police Department cell phone at 903-814-3343.

The Title IX Coordinators will begin an investigation upon request and will assume responsibility for your ongoing opportunities to take full advantage of your educational program.

Title IX Coordinators

Title IX Coordinator

Dr. Molly Harris
Dean of Student Affairs
903.463.8714 harrism [at] grayson [dot] edu

Title IX Deputy Coordinators

Dr. Logan Maxwell
Dean of South Campus
903-415-2601 maxwelll [at] grayson [dot] edu
Michael McBrayer
903-463-8753 mcbrayerm [at] grayson [dot] edu
GC Deputy Title IX Coordinator (for complaints against an employee)
Robyn Voight
Director of Human Resources
903.463.8648 voightr [at] grayson [dot] edu


For more information, see the complete Grayson College Title IX Policy. Prompt reporting is crucial to help ensure full investigation of complaints and is thus encouraged. 

If a survivor is uncertain about reporting or would like to discuss options, she or he can consult with the Sexual Misconduct Liaison. The Sexual Misconduct Liaison is a Licensed Professional Counselor and confidential resource who needs to report only general information that does not include your name or any identifiable information about you.

Sexual Misconduct Liaison 

Barbara Malone, Director of Counseling & Social Services
Second Floor, Life Center
903.463.8730
maloneb [at] grayson [dot] edu

About Domestic and Dating Violence

Dating Violence Statistics

  • Nearly half (43%) of dating college women report experiencing violent and abusive dating behaviors.
  • College students are not equipped to deal with dating abuse – 57% say it is difficult to identify and 58% say they don’t know how to help someone who’s experiencing it.
  • One in three (36%) dating college students has given a dating partner their computer, email or social network passwords and these students are more likely to experience digital dating abuse.
  • One in six (16%) college women has been sexually abused in a dating relationship.

Long-lasting Effects

  • Violent relationships can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and further domestic violence.
  • Being physically or sexually abused makes teen girls six times more likely to become pregnant and twice as likely to get a STI.
  • Half of youth who have been victims of both dating violence and rape attempt suicide, compared to 12.5% of non-abused girls and 5.4% of non-abused boys.

Lack of Awareness

  • Only 33% of teens who were in a violent relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.
  • Eighty-one (81) percent of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.
  • Though 82% of parents feel confident that they could recognize the signs if their child was experiencing dating abuse, a majority of parents (58%) could not correctly identify all the warning signs of abuse.

Looking for the citations for these stats?  Citations from Love is Respect.org

Domestic and Dating Violence Definitions

What is consent?

What is sexual violence?

  • Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to use of drugs/alcohol or an intellectual disability.
  • Sexual violence can occur between friends, classmates, spouses, romantic interests, acquaintances or strangers. Examples of sexual violence include rape, sexual assault, sexual battery and sexual coercion.

What is dating violence?

Dating violence is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Some examples include:

  • Physical
  • Emotional/Verbal/Psychological
  • Shoving
  • Punching
  • Slapping
  • Pinching
  • Hitting
  • Kicking
  • Hair pulling
  • Strangling
  • Intimidation (throwing things at you, blocking your way, etc.)
  • Not letting you hang out with your friends
  • Calling you frequently to find your whereabouts
  • Telling you what to wear
  • Having to be with you all the time
  • Calling you names
  • Jealousy
  • Belittling you

What is stalking?

The engaging in a course or conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others, or to suffer substantial emotional distress. Here are a few examples of common stalking incidents:

  • Show up at home or work uninvited
  • Send you unwanted messages
  • Leave unwanted gifts
  • Constantly call you and hang up 

Campus Resources

Campus Police – 903-463-8777 during regular business hours. If no answer, call or text the 24-hour Campus Police Department cell phone at 903-814-3343.

Title IX Coordinators

Title IX Coordinator

Dr. Molly Harris
Dean of Student Affairs
903.463.8714 harrism [at] grayson [dot] edu

Title IX Deputy Coordinators

Dr. Logan Maxwell
Dean of South Campus
903-415-2601 maxwelll [at] grayson [dot] edu
Michael McBrayer
903-463-8753 mcbrayerm [at] grayson [dot] edu
GC Deputy Title IX Coordinator (for complaints against an employee)
Robyn Voight
Director of Human Resources
903.463.8648 voightr [at] grayson [dot] edu

Sexual Misconduct Liaison 

Barbara Malone, Director of Counseling & Social Services
Second Floor, Life Center
903.463.8730
maloneb [at] grayson [dot] edu

Community Resources

 


National Resources:

Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act

In March 2013, the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act was signed into law as part of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Reauthorization. The SaVE Act is an amendment to the Clery Act and requires that all institutions of higher learning must educate students, faculty, and staff on the prevention of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. This legislation increases standards of campus response, disciplinary proceedings, and prevention education.

Use the resources on this page to complete your own personalized My Safety Plan document.